About Cynthia Sass MPH, MA. RD, CSSD

Cynthia Sass is a registered dietitian nutritionist with master’s degrees in both nutrition science and public health, a personal trainer certification, and formal training in culinary arts, mindfulness meditation, and integrative medicine. Board certified as a specialist in sports dietetics, Sass has consulted for four professional sports teams, and privately counsels clients in NYC, LA, and long-distance. She is also a frequent national TV guest, as well as a columnist, blogger, speaker, and three-time New York Times best-selling author. Her newest book is Slim Down Now: Shed Pounds and Inches with Real Food, Real Fast.

Celebrate Pear Love During American Heart Month

With an occasion like Valentine’s Day, there’s no better month to celebrate the heart than February. Embracing heart-healthy habits this Valentine’s season can translate to a lifetime of improved wellness, and one is as simple as eating more of a delicious food you enjoy – pears!

According to the American Heart Association, many factors contribute to heart disease, including your diet, activity level, age, and genetics. However, eating more produce may help fend off a heart attack or stroke. Pears in particular are an excellent source of fiber and a good source of immune-supporting Vitamin C – both key nutrients linked to heart health. With 6 grams, one medium pear provides nearly a quarter of the daily recommended fiber intake.

Including more pears in your diet – especially Green Anjou, Red Anjou, Bartlett and Bosc pears, which have all been Heart Health Certified by the American Heart Association – is one simple tactic for taking good care of your ticker. And it’s easy to incorporate pears into meals, snacks, and desserts. Blend a ripe pear into your morning smoothie or fold a diced or shredded pear into your oatmeal. Add fresh or oven roasted pear slices to a garden salad or mix chopped pears into a gingery stir-fry. At snack time, pair a fresh sliced pear with either almond butter or Mediterranean olives. For dessert, drizzle whole pears with a combo of maple syrup, fresh ginger and cinnamon, and bake in the oven, or dip fresh pear slices into melted dark chocolate.

Another savvy heart-health strategy is to simply keep more fruit, including pears, on hand, within sight and reach. According to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 90% of Americans fall short of the recommended minimum daily fruit intake. During American Heart Month, USA Pears is promoting a social contest called #WhatsInYourFruitBowl. The belief is that keeping a well-stocked fruit bowl within easy reach is a simple way to inspire more people to reach for fresh fruit. Give it a try and track your own fruit intake. And for more information about pears and heart health, visit http://usapears.org/heart-disease-and-stroke/.

Make sure to follow USA Pears on FacebookTwitter and Instagram for all things pears!

Want more pear recipes? Visit our recipe page!

Staying Fit and Healthy Through the Holidays

peartapemeasureToo many indulgences and fewer workouts can wreak havoc with your energy level and your waistline this time of year. However, there are simple ways to create balance that don’t require sacrificing your favorite goodies, or even stepping into a gym. Check out my realistic three-step strategy for staying fit through the holidays.

Step One: Whip up some healthy holiday dishes
Go ahead and enjoy your very favorite holiday foods prepared traditionally. But commit to lightening up others. For example, replace one pie with baked pears, or a mock pear cobbler. Simply sauté chopped ripe pears over low heat in a little water seasoned with a bit of fresh squeeze lemon juice and fresh grated ginger. Top with a healthy “crumble” made from mixing rolled oats and ground cinnamon into almond butter. Or instead of creamed spinach, serve a fresh spinach salad, dressed in balsamic vinaigrette, topped with sliced pears and chopped walnuts.

Step Two: Move in ways you look forward to
You don’t have to spend hours on the elliptical to burn off holiday calories. In fact, this is a great time of year to be active with family and friends in fun ways that can still keep you fit. Head to an ice skating rink, have a dance off, or organize a group hike, walk, or game.

Step Three: Make room for special indulgences.
Many of my clients find themselves eating things they don’t even really like during the holidays, simply because they’re there. When faced with a treat, take a moment to rate it, using a 5-star scale, 5 being “can’t-live-without” and 0 being “meh, if I pass it up, I won’t feel deprived.” If a food rates a 3 or less, skip it. And if it’s a worthwhile splurge create balance in simple ways. For example, if it’s carb-heavy, like a brownie, opt for a protein topped salad rather than a sandwich or wrap for lunch. This strategy literally allows you to have your cake (or pie) and eat it too!